Once made exclusively from the wool of sheep that roam the Isle of Lewis and Harris off the coast of Scotland, Harris tweed is now made only with wools that are imported, sometimes from the mainland and sometimes they come—as a result of a 1996 amendment to the Harris Tweed Act—from outside Scotland.


A. sometimes from the mainland and sometimes they come

B. sometimes from the mainland and sometimes

C. and come sometimes from the mainland or sometimes

D. from the mainland sometimes, or sometimes it comes

E. from the mainland sometimes, or sometimes coming


This question is based on Parallelism and Structure.


The underlined portion is a phrase that completes the idea begun by the clause “that are imported…” This clause describes the subject “wools”.

The underlined phrase tells us from where the wools are imported - sometimes from the mainland and…… 


To maintain parallelism, the phrase ‘sometimes from’ must be repeated. Since the preposition ‘from’ is already present after the dash, only the adverb ‘sometimes’ needs to be repeated.


In Option A, the presence of the pronoun ‘they’ and the verb ‘come’ affect parallelism. Since the phrase is part of the clause that is modifying “wools”, the relative pronoun ‘that’ refers to the subject ‘wools’. There is no need for another pronoun to refer to it. So, Option A can be eliminated.


The conjunction ‘and’ in this option changes the structure of the sentence. 

As conveyed by this option, the sentence would be as follows:

Once…..Harris tweed is now made only with wools that are imported, and come sometimes from the mainland or sometimes…….from outside Scotland.

The verb ‘come’ would apply to “Harris tweed” and the sentence would imply that Harris tweed comes sometimes from the mainland and sometimes from outside Scotland. Even if we accept that this is possible, the option contains a subject-verb disagreement. To agree with “Harris tweed” as the subject, the singular form of the verb ‘comes’ must be used. However, this option contains the plural form ‘come’. So, Option C can be eliminated.


Option D lacks parallelism. This option also has a pronoun error, since the singular pronoun ‘it’ cannot refer to ‘wools’. So, Option D can also be eliminated.


Option E also lacks parallelism. The participle ‘coming’ makes this option clumsy. So, Option E can also be eliminated.


Option B maintains parallelism - sometimes from the mainland and sometimes from outside Scotland. Therefore, B is the most appropriate option.